[Resolved] “Heartbleed” SSL vulnerability

On April 8, it was revealed in the media that a vulnerability in the internet encryption standard OpenSSL had been discovered. This vulnerability could potentially allow someone to access additional parts of the memory of servers protected by the OpenSSL software.

As stated in the OpenSSL Security Advisory:

A missing bounds check in the handling of the TLS heartbeat extension can be used to reveal up to 64k of memory to a connected client or server.

This could potentially compromise sensitive data such as the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of users, and actual content.

Runbox’ servers are secured

Runbox immediately upgraded our installations of OpenSSL on April 8 upon learning about this vulnerability. We have also reissued and reinstalled all our SSL certificates for both Web, POP, IMAP, and SMTP services.

Additionally Runbox web services already supports Perfect Forward Secrecy, which issues unique SSL key pairs for each connection. This prevents an unlikely eavesdropper from retroactively decrypting communications between server and client even if they managed to get the private key.

What you can do

We have no indications that any information has leaked from our systems, and our assessment is that the risk of such leaks is very small. Client computers and software are not affected by this vulnerability.

However, we recommend that you change your Runbox password to be entirely certain that no one else can access your account. It’s a good idea to change your password regularly, and use different passwords for different services. Please see Tips for choosing and protecting passwords for some useful rules about password generation and usage.

More information about Heartbleed from the security company Codenomicon is available at http://heartbleed.com/.

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4 thoughts on “[Resolved] “Heartbleed” SSL vulnerability”

  1. …and even better to see that you limited the risk of such an attack vector ahead of time with forward secrecy. I wish my banks would be that smart.

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